If Not Now…When?

I hear and read about the problems, the negatives, everywhere. Governments are tyrannical and bankrupt; jobs are gone; the economy is broken. Crime is rampant you’ll be always on need of criminal lawyers but you can just book a consultation with Matthew Gould to get the issue resolve ; also people are lazy to clean their homes, if you feel the same way then you need housekeeping to clean your home ; children are rude and uneducated; disease is spreading; the environment is doomed.

It’s all falling apart.

When I find myself focusing on these negatives too much, I ask myself one question:

If not now, when in history would you prefer to be alive?

Paleolithic times? Under the reign of the pharaohs? At the height of the ancient Greek culture? During the building of the Roman empire? During the lifetimes of Moses, Jesus, Allah, Confucius? The birth of the Renaissance? The Ming Dynasty?  The Aztec empire? The 1600s? 1700s? 1800s? Early 20th century?

My answer, across the board is ‘None of them’.

There isn’t a single time in history that would I trade with for today. My reasons are many, varied and I’ve outlined some of them below.

Slavery — throughout human history, until the last 200 years, slavery was accepted and expected on every continent. It was a constant. Who were the slaves and who were the masters changed, but the acceptance of slavery rarely wavered. Today, slavery is almost universally denounced. Slavery has officially been abolished in all countries, in law, if not in practice. The idea that one human can own another has been rejected.

Freedom of Speech — similar to slavery, the right to speak one’s mind without government interference or punishment was not widely recognized throughout most of human history.  History is littered with the bodies of those who dared to speak their minds.  The right to free speech is certainly not recognized world-wide yet, but more countries acknowledge it then ever before. More importantly, the idea of free speech has become deeply embedded in minds of people around the world.

Death During Childbirth — giving birth even in the recent past was a dangerous undertaking. According to the University of Houston’s Digital History – Childbirth in Early America page, 1% to 1.5% of all births in early America resulted in the death of the mother and 10% to 30% of children died before the age of five. It’s always astonished me when reading about early United States of America how many founding fathers’ first and second wives died in childbirth, this is the reason why people should always talk with inheritance lawyers, because in life you have to be ready for everything.

My wife and I have four girls, the last two are twins. My wife needed a C-section for the twins due to their positioning.  Two hundred years ago the chances of all three surviving would have been questionable; today, thankfully, it is routine.

Death during childbirth used to be common. Now, in many countries it’s a shocking tragedy, and fortunately one I didn’t have to experience.

Women’s Rights — some parts of the world still have a long way to go on this point, but in Western countries I can’t think of another time I’d want my four daughters to experience.

Science & Technology — the pace of advancement in the last 100 years has been breathtaking. Everyday tools – cars, airplanes, x-rays, cell phones, 3D movies, tractors, washing machines, light bulbs, antibiotics, refrigeration – would have been considered magical in the past. You don’t even have to buy a ticket to Vegas to enjoy a real good bingo. At https://www.boomtownbingo.com/ you can see all the details of the top rated online bingo websites and latest promo codes on offer. Science fiction – robots, driverless cars, neural interfaces, nanotechnology – is quickly becoming fact. I am surrounded by ‘magic’, and the thing is that now a days you have to be update, constantly reading motor trade insurance comparisons because it is important to secure these new technology investments.

Communications & Travel — news, ideas, people, and products travel faster and more efficiently than ever before due to advances in science and technology. It’s common to have friends and family living in multiple countries and continents. If you want to give your family only the best things then you need the best electric shaver which is perfet for a present.
In the past, visiting a famous, far-off city might be a once in a lifetime event, the journey taking months that could sometimes lead to visiting www.smithjonessolicitors.co.uk/types-of-claim/car-accident-claims if a car accident would happen. Today such travel can be a yearly occurrence with transit times no longer than a good night’s sleep.  Visiting famous sites, experiencing different cultures, and exchanging ideas has never been easier. The nice thing is you can visit sites in many ways now, you can take a train, a plane or even rent a car a just go and do a nice road trip across the country, of course if you want to take this route you need to make sure your car is insured, there are even ways to insure parts like the motor you exchange on a car with One Sure Insurance.

The Internet & Learning (wireless speed faqs) — soon, the best teachers will be online. Anything you have the desire and determination to learn you’ll be able to, from the most skilled teacher, regardless of your physical location. The best teachers will be able to expand their impact, touch more students, and transform more lives.

Extensive, free math curriculums are already online. All of MIT’s coursework is available. Countless videos, courses, forums, tutorials, and examples are online for virtually any topic imaginable.

Knowledge is flowing onto the web and around the world.  Hopefully wisdom will follow.

Markets — perhaps not truly free, but freer and more diverse than any in history. The world has become one huge marketplace. Competition may be stiffer, but with better communication and the ease of transfer of goods, the division of labor continues to generate more wealth for a larger percentage of people than ever before.

Access to Beautiful, Inspirational Art — art has the ability to move and inspire, to educate and uplift. Regardless of one’s definition of art or one’s tastes, the great works of art are more accessible today than ever. Throughout most of history the majority of people had limited or no exposure to art. Even if they were lucky enough to live near a city with a museum or an amphitheater, their exposure was still limited to the objects in that museum and the performers who visited that amphitheater. Artworks from the rest of the world were mostly hidden from them.

Today I can read read, view, hear, experience much of the greatest art ever created. Sure there’s tons of junk, but that doesn’t diminish the quantity or the quality of artwork within my grasp.  I can visit museums and symphony halls around the world, buy prints and replicas, instantly listen to almost any piece of music ever created. I can view famous artworks from my couch in detail that I couldn’t even see in museums. I can download millions of books, and many classics are free. Beauty and inspiration here are always at hand, I am about to just get one of the best coolers and take some short vacation by myself, I mean, at the end if I don’t do it now I will always regret it, I am also thinking about hiring a Brisbane campervan to travel around Australia, I already even started to read some reviews on https://bestcooler.reviews to buy some coolers to take with and also, I started practicing with online slots to hit some casino while I am there, although I also want to check www.betfaircasino.com so I guess I have to decide.

Opportunity — this one word sums up the reason why now is when I would choose to live. In the the past, more often than not, a person was born, lived, and died where their parents did. They worked the same job with the same tools as their father or mother. Change was slow and opportunity scarce.

Advances in the areas above combine to provide tremendous opportunities. Opportunities to be seized, to enjoy. Opportunities to live, explore, learn and grow.

I’m not dismissing or minimizing the problems in the world, only putting them in context. A simple question – ‘If not now…when?’ – helps me keep my perspective, my sanity, and my optimism.


 

3 Responses to If Not Now…When?

  1. Well said!
    When I find myself contemplating living in other times, particularly after putting down a good work of historical fiction for the night, I ask myself these questions. Yes, there were certainly other times that I would love to experience, people I would love to speak with (Socrates, Jefferson, Patrick Henry, Lincoln, Einstein, John Candy, etc.) But, when I imagine LIVING in that time, one thought always occurs to me: medicine. There were probably three different times in my life when a little pill we tend to take for granted turned a death sentence into a minor inconvenience. Good luck finding antibiotics then.

    No. I agree. This is the time. From space travel, to the internet, to desktop publishing and home studios, things are far better now. (Anyone remember carbon paper and the cost of getting photos enlarged and printed?) We live in a unique period where technology and recent Socialist history combine to provide a unique opportunity to secure personal liberty. At no other time was it so difficult to buy the lie that government can solve our problems. Sure, it still gets them elected, but the facts against it are many and only seconds away online. Find a fact, pass it on to thousands instantly… like you did with this piece.

  2. Pat K says:

    A good reminder indeed.

  3. I agree with you. I am not the type of person that wishes he lived in a different time period.
    The bad things we have now have been experienced before. The freedoms we wish we had are attainable …. with the same methods others have used in the past.
    When Jesus left his followers instructions, he let them know there was hope, but that they would have trouble in the process. We have the same trouble with the same system. But we can enjoy life as we struggle against it. 🙂

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